#ChurchToo

“I think God is cleaning up the church.”— L

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Trade Your Day

Everyday you wake up, you have to trade your day for something. That’s what leads to commitment.

— 5/2, Friend summarizing Veritas Podcast he listened to…

The basic gist: Live everyday pursuing something and trading in that day for its worth. Do something worthy.

Be at Peace

Do not look forward in fear to the changes in life;
rather, look to them with full hope that as they arise,
God, whose very own you are, will lead you safely through all things;
and when you cannot stand it, God will carry you in His arms.

Do not fear what may happen tomorrow;
the same understanding Father who cares for you today
will take care of you then and every day.

He will either shield you from suffering
or will give you unfailing strength to bear it.
Be at peace, and put aside all anxious thoughts and imaginations.

— Prayer of St. Francis de Sales

Kiss the Wave

“I have learned to kiss the wave that throws me against the Rock of Ages.”

— C.H. Spurgeon

There is only a shallow joy we can receive when we tie our joy to our ever-changing circumstances. It’s a joy that gets rocked as it’s blown and tossed by the waves of our pain. It’s a joy that only rejoices when our life is perfectly manicured according to our desires. But true and lasting joy comes when we find our joy resting on the Rock of Ages.

Ultimately, what suffering does for true faith is take us to God. If God himself is the good news of the gospel, then trials are not something to run from, but something we ride to our Maker. We share in Christ’s sufferings and shine the spotlight on him in our pain. And they make us more and more like him. None of God’s purposes can be frustrated. Our suffering is not an accident.

Let the waves of your suffering take you to Jesus.

— Dave Furman

Into Greater Love

“The mark of wisdom is to be ready for suffering. If you aren’t, you aren’t competent with regard to the realities of life. But suffering is also a discipline for growth in wisdom. It can drive you toward God into greater love and strength or away from him into hardness of heart.”

— Tim Keller

Cultivating Praise

“As you grow in this, it will do more than strengthen your marriage. When we praise one another, we are, in a sense, practicing for glory. Paul writes, “you can boast of us just as we will boast of you in the day of the Lord Jesus” (2 Cor 1:14b). Praise and affirmation are surely synonyms for boasting in one another. It is our joyful and solemn responsibility to help each other on to glory, looking for the good, affirming Christ-like character, and pointing out evidence of Jesus himself in our spouses in a way that encourages, builds up, and refreshes.

And don’t wait. Pastor and author J. R. Miller (1840-1912) wrote about “Kindness That Comes Too Late.” He contrasts a funeral where friends and family gather to speak good and pleasant words about a deceased person’s character to the story in Luke 7 where a woman anoints Jesus with perfume before he dies. She doesn’t wait until he’s dead to break open the alabaster jar to refresh Jesus’ tired and weary feet. Miller pleads with us, “The kind words are lying in men’s hearts unexpressed, and trembling on their tongues unvoiced, which will be spoken by and by when these weary ones are dead—but why should they not be spoken now, when they are needed so much, and when their accents would be so pleasing and grateful?”

In marriage, let us encourage each other daily and not wait until the eulogy—where it brings no blessing to the deceased. Let us commit to building up and encouraging each other today.”

Aaron Sironi, https://www.ccef.org/resources/blog/cultivating-praise-marriage

In Loving Sympathy

“What does it mean to be ‘into the world’? It means to come close. It means not shouting the gospel from a distance, but to put ourselves with loving sympathy inside the questions of the questioners, the loneliness of the lonely, the pain of the hurting.”

— John Stott

“Not an Ending But a Sending”

“It’s not a matter of choosing between worship or mission; nor are we faced with the false dichotomy of church or world, cathedral or city. To the contrary, we worship for mission; we gather for sending; we center ourselves in the practices of the body of Christ for the sake of the world; we are reformed in the cathedral to undertake our image-bearing commission to reform the city. “

— James Smith